Real World Science Blog

This is where teachers in the Real World Science cohort communicate about their work on the citizen scientist project. In this project their students collect high and low temperatures and precipitation data from their site, and compare it to what happened in the same place 75 years ago. Teachers share information about their data, how they collect it, how they analyze it, and what patterns they are finding.

About this Blog

There are classrooms all over the country collecting data on what their weather is like today, and what it was like 75 years ago today. Follow their progress here.

Robert Wallace's Classroom
The National WWII Museum
New Orleans , LA
The link below will take you to pdf files of the lessons. The complete file is too large to upload or download, so it is divided into chapters. http://bit.ly/2kRpdjH
Spencer Cody's Classroom
Hoven High School
Hoven, SD
The activity that documents Forrest Villarubia’s experience with a worm infection contracted from contaminated water was a great introductory activity to cover lab practical material dealing with two worm phyla:  Platyhelminthes and Nematoda.  Students commonly get flatworm and roundworm ailments confused.  Forrest's detailed case study proved to be a valuable teaching tool for this curriculum helping students differentiate among symptoms and worm characteristics through the experiences of a World War II veteran.  Students in a high school Zoology class were given the student handout on p.
Spencer Cody's Classroom
Hoven High School
Hoven, SD
Today the 8th grade Life Science class in Hoven, South Dakota, worked on the Assembly Line activity from the Real World Science curriculum.  It worked as a great lead in for the Cell Factory Model lab from the Laying the Foundation series.  Students worked in three groups trying to improve their assembly line apparatus.  Comparisons were later drawn between their assembly line and the cell's endoplasmic reticulum and Golgi apparatus and other cellular components.  The assembly line activity is a quick and easy activity that can be applied to many lab science areas that involve groups workin
Robert Wallace's Classroom
The National WWII Museum
New Orleans , LA
UNO published yesterday a great little article on our work together last week. It has pictures, and quotes, and is awesome. You should check it out, and then use it to explain to your friends and family what you were doing down here, and with your colleagues and supervisors to summarize why you are doing things a little differently this year. And later you can share it with friends who are also teachers to encourage them to apply.
Robert Wallace's Classroom
The National WWII Museum
New Orleans , LA
We talked about this during our week together, and I wanted to make sure you have resources to support your own practice and to share with colleagues.  This is a very recent article from a great author and scientist Anya Kamenetz. She talks about research done in the Private Universe project. This talk by Jonathon Drori also discusses that project.
Robert Wallace's Classroom
The National WWII Museum
New Orleans , LA
Real World Science participants didn't get to see the PT-305 under renovation this summer, because it was off-limits during construction of a new cradle. Now, all teachers will have access to a behind-the-scenes look at this modern take on the historic WWII boat! The renovation of the PT-305 boat, a torpedo boat with a hull of mahogany, and three big packard engines, is nearing completion.
Robert Wallace's Classroom
The National WWII Museum
New Orleans , LA
Our Colleague Dr. Matthew Tarr has been awarded an NSF grant of about $450K to study how sunlight degrades oil from oil spills. Our 2015 cohort will remember that he talked about his first studies on degradation of oil when we visited his labs at UNO. Now he has the funding to continue these studies. For those who have not yet participated in the Real World Science seminar at The National WWII Museum, Dr. Tarr is our academic partner for the program. He helps with the planning and facilitation of the whole week, and leads the part that takes place at UNO.
Robert Wallace's Classroom
The National WWII Museum
New Orleans , LA
I use a Mystery Boxes lab to teach students to separate observations and interpretations. You could use this at the beginning of the year, or any time that you want to boost engagement and science thinking. My version is a little different than other ones you might find online, because it is designed to use multiple senses for observation, and to pose particular challenges to student thinking. I like to use with students a comparison between scientists and detectives. They both need to collect all their evidence before coming to conclusions.
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